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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

3 edition of Eusebius of Emesa found in the catalog.

Eusebius of Emesa

Robert E. Winn

Eusebius of Emesa

church and theology in the mid-fourth century

by Robert E. Winn

  • 22 Want to read
  • 29 Currently reading

Published by Catholic University of America Press in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Sermons..,
  • Church history

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. ) and index.

    StatementRobert E. Winn
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsBR65.E76 W56 2011
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24842454M
    ISBN 109780813218762
    LC Control Number2011014812

    Eusebius has 62 books on Goodreads with ratings. Eusebius’s most popular book is The History of the Church: From Christ to Constantine. "Eusebius, the bishop of Emesa (c. ) is today not a well-known figure of late ancient Christianity. Yet he achieved apparent notoriety in antiquity: he was a student of the famous Eusebius of Caesarea, he was connected to the entourage of the emperor Constantius, he had earned the respect of prominent ecclesiastical figures in the mid-fourth century, and he was recognized as a talented.

    The best known among them were Eusebius of Nicomedia (called by Arius the brother of Eusebius of Cæsarea), Eusebius of Emesa, and Eusebius of Samosata. The exact date of our author's birth is unknown to us, but his Ecclesiastical History contains notices which enable us to fix it approximately.   In addition to the Church History we have from Eusebius’ pen a Chronicle in two books (c. ; later continued down to ), the first containing an epitome of universal history, the second chronological tables exhibiting in parallel columns the royal succession in different nations, and accompanied by notes marking the dates of historical events. A revised edition of the second book .

      Church History. Life of Constantine the Great. Oration in Praise of Constantine by Eusebius, Bishop of Emesa, ca. ca. Schaff, Philip, , editor. Roger Pearse post: Angelo Mai comments on a catena fragment of Eusebius Another delightful thing has happened to me. While I was translating from Greek into Latin all the passages of Eusebius in the MS of Nicetas’ Catena on Luke, I fortunately observed that the last passage of Eusebius, written on the two final pages of the MS, corresponded word-for-word with Theophania bk 4 chs.8 and 9, as.


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Eusebius of Emesa by Robert E. Winn Download PDF EPUB FB2

The volume first introduces readers to the world of Eusebius by situating him in a historical context of places important in his life--Edessa, Antioch, and Emesa--as well as the people with which he was connected, Eusebius of Caesarea and George of Laodicea among : Robert E.

Winn. Eusebius of Emesa Book Description: Through a careful examination of his extant sermons, some of which survive in Latin and others in classical Armenian, this book invites readers to hear a bishop's voice from the mid- fourth century, an important period in late antique Christianity.

Eusebius of Emesa: Church and Theology in the Mid-Fourth Century. In this Book. Additional Information. Eusebius of Emesa: Church and Theology in the Mid-Fourth Century some of which survive in Latin and others in classical Armenian, this book invites readers to hear a bishop's voice from the mid- fourth century, an important period in late Author: Robert E.

Eusebius of Emesa book. Eusebius of Emesa Book Summary: Through a careful examination of his extant sermons, some of which survive in Latin Eusebius of Emesa book others in classical Armenian, this book invites readers to hear a bishop's voice from the mid- fourth century, an important period in late antique Christianity.

Eusebius of Emesa [electronic resource]: church & theology in the mid-fourth century / Robert E. Winn. Main author: Winn, Robert E. Corporate Author: Ebook Central Academic Complete., ProQuest (Firm) Format: eBook Online access: Connect to electronic book via Ebook Central.

Home > Fathers of the Church > Church History (Eusebius) > Book VIII. Church History (Book VIII) Zenobius, a presbyter of the church at Sidon; and Silvanus, bishop of the churches about Emesa.

The last of these, with others, was made food for wild beasts at Emesa, and was thus received into the ranks of. EUSEBIUSCHURCHHISTORY: BOOK III, Index. BOOK III Index CHAPTER 1. The Parts of the World in which the Apostles preached Christ CHAPTER 2. The First Ruler of the Church of Rome CHAPTER 3.

The Epistles of the Apostles CHAPTER 4. The First Successors of the Apostles CHAPTER 5. The Last Siege of the Jews after Christ CHAPTER 6. Home > Fathers of the Church > Church History (Eusebius) > Book IX.

Church History (Book IX) Three of them in the city of Emesa in Phœnicia, having confessed that they were Christians, were thrown as food to the wild beasts. Among them was a bishop Silvanus, a very old man.

Eusebius of Emesa, (born c. Edessa, Macedonia [now in Greece]—died c. Antioch, Syria [now Antakya, Tur.]), bishop of Emesa, one of the chief doctrinal writers on Semi-Arianism, a modified Arianism that held that Christ was “like” God the Father but not of one substance.

eusebius' pupil, eusebius of emesa, provides some incidental information. —books— an ecclesiastical history to the 20th year of the reign of constantine the ecclesiastical history the life of the blessed emperor constantine the preparation for the gospel the proof of the gospel: being the demonstratio evangelica of eusebius of cÆsarea5/5(2).

Christianity: The views of Eusebius of Caesarea Eusebius was baptized and ordained at Caesarea, where he was taught by the learned presbyter Pamphilus, to whom he was bound by ties of respect and affection and from whom he derived the name “Eusebius Pamphili” (the son or servant of Pamphilus).

Eusebius’ History of the Church (Book I) Chapter I: The Plan of the Work 1. It is my purpose to write an account of the successions of the holy apostles, as well as of the times which have elapsed from the days of our Savior to our own; and to relate the many important events which are said to have occurred in.

Eusebius of Emesa’s Commentary on Genesis and the Origins of the Antiochene School. Sermon 15 is plainly labelled as by Eusebius of Emesa. In the CPG 2, there is a list of sermons by Eusebius of Emesa extant in Armenian.

Sermon 5, De passione is identified as identical with sermons 14 and 15 from the Aucher edition. I have therefore corrected the attribution at the top.] 2 S. Luke and s. Mark alone mention it. Scholars of early Christianity have not known what to make of Eusebius of Emesa (c.

–59). His writings did not survive in their original Greek, but in Latin and Armenian translations. His writings did not survive in their original Greek, but in Latin and Armenian translations. Robert E. Winn received his Ph.D. in Early Christian Studies from the Catholic University of America and is associate professor of history at Northwestern College in us, the bishop of Emesa (c.

) is today not a well-known figure of late ancient Christianity. EUSEBIUS [of Emesa] (d. ), a learned ecclesiastic of the Greek church, was born at Edessa about the beginning of the 4th century. After receiving his early education in his native town, he studied theology at Caesarea and Antioch and philosophy and science at Alexandria.

Scholars of early Christianity have not known what to make of Eusebius of Emesa (c. His writings did not survive in their original Greek, but in Latin and Armenian translations.

Furthermore, he does not fit many precon- ceived notions of the fourth century. Internet Archive BookReader Church History. Life of Constantine the Great. Oration in Praise of Constantine. [German Version] (born c. in Edessa, died shortly before ) was a student of Polychronius of Skythopolis and Eusebius of Caesarea in Palestine; he also studied in Antioch and Alexandria; he was one of the founders of Antiochene biblical exegesis (interpretations of the Pentateuch, of the books of Kings, and of individual letters of Paul – probably in continuation of the exegetical work.

Eusebius too, was imprisoned but managed to avoid his mentor's fate. Aroundabout the time of Constantine's Edict of Milan, Eusebius became bishop of the Palestinian city.A different Eusebius, that of Emesa (c), provides a useful test case, being the only writer prior to Jerome who seems truly to have given exegetical priority to the Hebrew text (ho hebraios or to hebraikon, as he calls it).

20 However, recent research has shown that Eusebius’ personal, direct knowledge of Hebrew was very limited. 21 Author: Scott Fitzgerald Johnson.Internal evidence in the fragments themselves, and circumstances surrounding the life of the fourth-century bishop Eusebius of Emesa, point to that prelate as the likely author of the source identified by Burgess.

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